Category Archives: Politics

Reaching ‘peak stuff’ and how it has changed my view and what I want…

So, the feeling has been building for a while but I think my wife and I have finally reached ‘peak stuff’, that is the notion that we now have enough material possessions in our lives and that we no longer wish to keep gathering more. This makes us very bad citizens in the current age when you are encouraged to buy more and to consume more and to not think about the environmental cost of all this and instead to think about the benefits to the economy. It also causes issues at Christmas with all the gift giving and receiving.

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But the reality is that we really do have enough stuff. We live in a small apartment and, unless something dramatic changes (which it actually might be, if some newspaper reports are right), we won’t be buying a house anytime soon. Therefore we can only buy and keep the stuff that we can fit into said apartment. We have moved several times in the past decade (another increasing trend among my generation and the next), including to and from Canada and this required us to shed the vast majority of our stuff (and to buy new, which was quite fun), the rest was stored to await our return. But even those things, those possessions that we decided were worth keeping, are now looking like unnecessary junk in our lives and we are considering losing more and more of what remains.

 

In addition to this, I have sold off the majority of collectibles that I owned from many years spent building a substantial Transformers and Star Wars Black figures collection. Losing that feeling of needing to own stuff means that these figures would inevitably be heading out the door, and selling them actually paid for our car. I have also stopped buying graphic novels, which has been a passion of mine for a long time (though I still buy beautiful hardcovers of series I love, my last remaining weakness). I had gradually been moving to digital for my book and graphic novel needs anyway so replacing them with electronic versions when they have been available for a good price is a good move. Most of my physical books are borrowed from the library, breaking the link between owning and reading, and subscriptions to online streaming services have ended the need to buy physical copies of movies. All that we have left are mostly mementos of our lives and our travels and I am realising more and more that we need little else.

 

So then the question changes from what do I need to buy and own to what else do I want? I want an electric car (something else that seems right on the cusp of becoming mainstream) for I do not want to keep contributing to our humongous carbon dioxide output. I want less plastic to pass through my hands simply because I have a need to eat (why does a cucumber now come wrapped in this?). I want to eat well (our Riverford Farms weekly veg box helps with that http://tinyurl.com/j58aep6). I want the world to stop consuming fossil fuels when alternatives are finally reaching the mainstream (higher plastic use is clearly a by-product of oil consumption when we have significant quantities of oil derivatives to use) and I want renewable energy to become the norm, as I was told as a kid that it would be. My wife and I recently switched our energy supplier to Green Star (website: https://www.mygreenstarenergy.com/) who source their energy from renewables and that felt like a step in the right direction and a very good thing indeed. I also want everything that I discard to be recycled, though the rates of doing so are still dismal.

 

Finally, I want a political system in my country that works, one that meets the needs of the people and not of the elites and the Corporations who fund them. I want a truly representative Parliament, one that listens to us when they express ourselves and our concerns and then acts to help. I want enough houses to be built in the UK so that those who choose to buy are able to do so. I want a properly regulated financial system that doesn’t always seem like it’s about to bring about financial apocalypse (http://tinyurl.com/zgjg8ll). I want a powerful and well funded environmental agency that will police the actions of those who seek to destroy it, which we currently do not have (http://tinyurl.com/hszoort). And I want a forward looking political system that actually addresses the changes that are coming in the near future, like driver-less cars and ever more insecure working conditions.

 

It sounds like I want a lot, huh, but I really don’t think that I do, and I also think that many of you out there would agree with this point of view. Let me know if you do, eh. Cheers!

 

 

My debut novel, ‘Only an atheist can help God save the world’, now has TWELVE reader reviews with an average of 4.4 stars and is available from all electronic retailers. The sequel, ‘Jesus Returns: here he comes again’, will be out soon! Also check out my other “Rambling” blogs posts for articles on being an indie author, comics, politics, and reviews of books and movies! Also follow me on Twitter @onlyanatheist1. Cheers!

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My review of Gary Younge’s ‘Another Day in the Death of America’…

It’s been a while since I’ve reviewed a non-fiction book on this blog and so this time my post is a review of Gary Younge’s ‘Another Day in the Death of America’, which seems especially poignant given the dramatic result of the US election earlier this week. This book tells the (brief) life-stories of all of the children and teenagers killed by gun violence on a random Saturday in 2013. It was not a special day, just the one that Younge chose at random, and each Chapter of this book is devoted to each of those lives. Younge tells the story of his adopted country (he is British by birth) through the medium of those killed in this manner, which amounted to ten young lives lost to gun violence. These lives were taken in various ways from gangland murders to accidental killings where a loaded firearm went off either though an accident, through a misunderstanding or an act of stupidity, and in each case a young life was lost. Each of their stories are told with care and attention and the loss of these young lives is palpable, the grief caused to their loved ones apparent. This is definitely not light-hearted fare but it is a worthy read, nevertheless.
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It is a sad indictment of America that this is their normal, that the ten children killed on this day, and the countless who will have died before and since, barely warrant news coverage. Some did get attention, but many did not, and even those who did had but the briefest of spotlights. Younge also highlights the disparity in justice served to those who committed these acts, whether by accident or though vicious intent, and demonstrates their varied fates from jail time to the perpetrator never being found. This insane status quo is accepted as the normal and will no doubt continue until something dramatic happens, whatever that might be. And when the death of nearly a dozen children in one day is not considered enough then I do not know what would be. In most other countries these events would justify national coverage, along with a debate to decide on a course of action, but in the US there is only silence.

‘Another Day in the Death of America’ is a remarkable and tragic read. It is thoroughly researched and Younge managed to interview the families of nearly all of the children killed on this day. As he himself says, any other day would’ve produced a different set of stories, but all of them would be linked by the tragedy that continues on everyday in America. Having watched previous presidents try and fail to change the culture that permits this wholesale slaughter, I find it unlikely that the next incumbent will address this problem. I heartily recommend that you read ‘Another Day in the Death of America’ though you may find it a troubling and heartbreaking experience. I know I did but when you are reading how the lives of ten young men were cut short that is unsurprising. What is surprising is that America and its citizens continue to allow this to happen. Eventually, I assume, this will change but with Donald Trump now the incoming President it seems unlikely. For now the killings will continue and many more books like this one could be made. This is a sad state of affairs indeed.

 

My debut novel, ‘Only an atheist can help God save the world’, now has TWELVE reader reviews with an average of 4.4 stars and is available from all electronic retailers. It’s sequel, ‘Jesus Returns: here he comes again’, will be out soon! Also check out my other “Rambling” blogs posts for articles on being an indie author, comics, politics, and reviews of books and movies! Also follow me on Twitter @onlyanatheist1. Cheers!

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My review of Terry Pratchett’s ‘A Slip of the Keyboard’…

This time I’m reviewing Terry Pratchett’s ‘A Slip of the Keyboard’, his book of collected non-fiction. I have been a fan of Mr. Pratchett’s for as long as I can remember, I read his and Neil Gaiman’s ‘Good Omens’ in my teens and every Discworld novel since then, along with most of the rest of Pratchett’s output. But before reading this book I hadn’t read much of his non-fiction output and so this collection was a joy to find and devour. I also think that it is fair to say that Pratchett, along with Gaiman, is a huge influence on my work and writings (who isn’t influenced by this pair, though) and reader reviews have even made that comparison more directly than I would ever dare (review here: http://tinyurl.com/pgjd68z), which is lovely! Anyway, onto my review.

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So, ‘A Slip of the Keyboard’ includes all manner of articles Pratchett wrote from the 1970’s to almost current day where he talks about things ranging from what his life as a writer was really like both at home and on the road, to his thoughts on paying taxes or on education, to how much his life changed since he announced that he was suffering from a rare form of Alzheimer’s. The articles range from the absolutely hilarious to the heartbreakingly poignant and I don’t remember the last time I read or saw anything that made me laugh as much as this book. And it’s non-fiction! But Pratchett knows how to set up and deliver a joke and the speech’s that he gave must surely have been absolute barnstormers. I had to continuously pause when I was reading the book so that I could stop myself from laughing too loudly on the train to work. I think I might even be scaring the other passengers a little! Oh, well.

Pratchett also covered matters that he clearly felt strongly about including the need for regulated assisted suicide in the UK (or assisted death as Pratchett prefers to call it) so as to reduce the suffering of people with terminal illnesses to how poorly funded Alzheimer’s research is compared to things like cancer research. These articles obviously have a different feel that the openly comic ones that the book starts with but they are nevertheless a joy to read.  As with Gaiman’s ‘View from the Cheap Seats’ (review here: http://tinyurl.com/zklvpvp), there’s a strong sense when reading this book of the author talking directly to the reader and that is just wonderful! As a young, self-published author with no agent, publishing house or support network, I am yet to go on a book tour or do a signing but I’m hoping to get to that point someday and Pratchett’s words on what it is like and how to cope with the stresses of said life are invaluable. These articles are also incredibly entertaining too which always helps!

As a fan of his work, I’ve read the vast majority of Pratchett’s output (I still have to read ‘Nation’, his best book according to the author, so I shall definitely have to hunt that out) and this is one of the one’s that I have enjoyed the most. I expected to enjoy it, but not nearly as much as a I did. ‘A Slip of the Keyboard’ is a joy to read from start to finish, through the early articles and letters onto his life as an author to his fight against Alzheimer’s and how much his life changed when he announced he was suffering from the disease. I highly recommend this book to any and all writers out there as well as to fans of his work who simply want more of his writings to read, even if what we all really want is more Discworld novels.  Pratchett has left an incredible legacy and this is one part of said legacy that deserves to be read and enjoyed by as wide an audience as possible. So go out and read it people!

 

My debut novel, ‘Only an atheist can help God save the world’, now has TWELVE reviews with an average of 4.4 stars and is available from all electronic retailers. It’s sequel, ‘Jesus Returns: here he comes again’, will be out soon! Also check out my other “Rambling” blogs posts for articles on being an indie author, comics, politics, and reviews of books and movies! Also follow me on Twitter @onlyanatheist1. Cheers!

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I recently worked in retail. Here are my ‘ramblings’ on how it has changed…

This week, I’m ‘rambling’ about something a little different. For the past six months I have been working in retail, more specifically in a local supermarket, and for someone like me who has both a degree and PhD in Neuroscience, this was less than ideal. Between December 2014 and May 2016 I applied for hundreds of jobs and I attended 15 interviews, a soul-crushing experience, before I was finally offered a part-time position back in science. Living in the South-East of England is ridiculously expensive my wife and one salary was insufficient for my wife and I to make ends meet so during this period, I went to work in my local store to help us out financially. The job was your standard retail opportunity; boring and physical and tedious but my point is this: between the last time I worked in retail (during my undergraduate degree) and now, it is obvious that conditions have deteriorated by a significant amount and I was not at all surprised to see the news reports of horrendous conditions inside Sports Direct (https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jun/07/sports-direct-agrees-back-pay-deal-with-hmrc-minimum-wage). Actually, I think the conditions that I worked in were not that bad but, given the downwards trend, they are likely to worsen.

So, the job was hard and physical and poorly paid, though actually a little better than minimum wage (or even Osborne’s derisory ‘living wage’ which is no such thing). I was already of the mindset that the minimum wage should now be £10 an hour and working here only reinforced that idea. I spent 7.5 hours each day on my feet, carrying heavy boxes, filling shelves and pulling around carts. I came home exhausted and I lost a considerable amount of weight during this time. I also gained a some muscle, an up-side, and increased my stamina which has helped me in my new job to cope with the travel to and from London. Yet I was only working 3-4 days a week and I find it hard to imagine how exhausted those who worked full-time must’ve been. Yet with the recent shift to part-time workers, full-time contracts are now much rarer and very few of my colleagues had this. Part-time contracts come with fewer benefits and paid days off and instead they offer you over-time to make up the difference if you need it. Fortunately, I did not.

It was immediately obvious that, since my last stint in retail, that conditions have considerably worsened and that the balance of power has squarely shifted in favour of the employer and the management. It used to be that if you worked a nine hour shift you earned three breaks: an unpaid one hour lunch break and two paid 15 minute breaks. These 15 minute breaks are now no longer paid. Additionally, workers lost the right to paid sick days, unless you are out of work for more than three days. I was unwell three times during my six months working there and each time I was genuinely sick. On two of these occasions I had to leave the store and come home to bed. I understand that a sizable portion of their work force is comprised of teenaged workers who are hard to motivate and who would abuse a system that allows them to get paid for days when they can claim they are sick (more often hung-over). But for me and those who needed the job and took it seriously, it was an insult. For anyone with a family who require days to care for them, it is truly horrendous. I also had to sit through a hilarious meeting with two managers to check that I was ‘OK’ and that they didn’t need to discipline me for my (insignificant) absences. Hmm.

My time in this job also made me wonder how these workers manage to make ends meet. With the crazy-high levels of rent required to get even a small apartment in the south-east of the country and all of the other expenses that life incurs like paying your energy bills, feeding your family, owning and running a car, and so forth, I wonder how they do it. And now that they lose pay due to genuine sickness this only adds to their problems. Tax credits and other assistance that a family can claim obviously help, but the current Tory government is doing what it can to take that money away from those who actually do work and genuinely need the support. All in the name of getting the ‘lazy English workers’ back to work.

Despite my grumblings, it wasn’t all bad. One of the things that I did enjoy during my time in the store was the people that I worked with. Most of them were warm, friendly people who were genuinely interested in getting to know me. Of course, there were also some arseholes (including a manager whose name I won’t mention) and some colleagues who went out of their way to be petty and pathetic but knowing that I hopefully wouldn’t be in this environment for the long-run certainly helped me to deal with matters like that. I genuinely enjoyed seeing my co-workers on a daily basis, chatting to them and since leaving I am missing their company. I’m also aware that my current position is only part-time and temporary (it is maternity leave cover) and so there is the possibility that I may end up back in a supermaket in the near future. God I hope not!

I was fortunate to have a way out of this situation and the day that I was offered my new job was a joyful one indeed. But for many of my former co-workers, this is it, this is their life. Short-term, unstable contracts that are poorly paid, do not provide sick pay, and where the next group of incoming workers are offered worse conditions than the current ones. With the impending EU referendum, and the promise from those on the Leave side to have a ‘bonfire of regulations’ should Britain vote to leave, I worry for their future. I’m concerned that, in addition to unpaid sick days, that our government may choose to scrap the right to paid holiday days, a definite upside to working in a position like this one, and that conditions will further deteriorate. Yet, without the return of strong unions, something that seems unlikely at this current time, I do not see matters improving anytime soon. I wonder at what point this government will decide they have taken enough from the poorest in our society and that these people need support, not punishment. Then I remember that it’s a Tory government and my heart sinks. Bring on the next general election and hopefully, a change. Retail workers really need it.

 

My debut novel, ‘Only an atheist can help God save the world’, is available now from all electronic retailers. Also check out my other “Rambling” blogs posts for articles on being an indie author, comics, politics, and reviews of books and movies! Also follow me on Twitter @onlyanatheist1. Cheers!

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My review of Paul Mason’s ‘Postcapitalism’…

Recently I’ve read and reviewed a short list of non-fiction, mostly politics books from Laurie Penny’s ‘Unspeakable Things’ (http://tinyurl.com/jl5trzc) to Owen Jones’ ‘The Establishment’ (http://tinyurl.com/jo8sekz) and George Monbiot’s ‘Captive State’ (http://tinyurl.com/zevxd7g) as well as a few others. This week I’m reviewing Paul Mason’s ‘Postcapitalism’, a book that is a little different than my other recent reads in that it not only explains how Capitalism got to the point where the author thinks that it will soon collapse, but he also details what might be to come and it is a fascinating read. Onwards to my review!

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In clear and accessible language, Mason talks us through the history of Capitalism and how this economic model, especially the current form of Neo-Liberalism, has driven our world economy to the brink of its own destruction. He explains that this system must inevitably end and that something else take its place. Mason challenges the assumption that Capitalism will always be our economic model, starting from the point that it has not always been so, and moving onward to the changes that are to come. The Postcapitalism model, as seen by Mason, is driven by the rise of information technology, the fall of Labour as the driving force behind value in the production of goods and the desire of information to be free. The internet and the ever increasing connectivity of the next generation is a key part of this coming change and something that, now in place, will be extremely hard to undo. Impossible, I would say.

As someone who has an interest in politics and in the future, I found this a fascinating read and I feel that I can already see much of what Mason addresses becoming reality. Reading this book during the upcoming EU referendum also makes for a fascinating experience. Mason makes the claim that the end of Capitalism and Neo-Liberalism will likely be caused by an outside shock of exactly the sort that the UK leaving the EU might cause. Although that scenario currently seems unlikely, should the UK remain in the EU there is still the possibility that other countries, like Greece , Italy, Spain, may decide that they would prefer not to accept the conditions of remaining and their leaving may be the shock that hastens the end of our current economic model and the move forwards to postcapitalism.

One of the aspects of this coming revolution that fascinates me is that this ongoing change is being driven not by my generation but by the next. I already have an interest in how those younger than me engage with and consume media and, having talked with my younger sister and her friends, it seems that there is a clear difference. I am still stuck buying and owning DVDS, and watching television, though the means by which I access these shows is via the internet. But my sister and her friends don’t own or watch their TV except to have games consoles and internet connections attached to them and all media is consumed through this medium and via streaming services like Netflix. As a result the model for this particular part of their lives has shifted and I only see this change becoming more dramatic. It also changes how her generation access their news, bypassing conventional sources, and pushing them towards different agencies and I find this to be a very interesting thing indeed!

Postcapitalism is a superb book that is accessible and well written and one that I thoroughly enjoyed. I can’t recommend it highly enough and if you have any interest in the future, in the end of Capitalism and Neo-liberalism, and in what might replace it in the years to come, then you should read it. I’m glad that I did! Up next time I hope to review either be ‘The Hollowing of Democracy’ or Johann Hari’s ‘Chasing the Scream’. I just have to find the time to actually read them both! Cheers!

 

 

My debut novel, ‘Only an atheist can help God save the world’, is available now from all electronic retailers. Also check out my other “Rambling” blogs posts for articles on being an indie author, comics, politics, and reviews of books and movies! Also follow me on Twitter @onlyanatheist1. Cheers!

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My ‘rambling’ review of ‘Blunders of our Government’…

So, recently I’ve been on a spree of reading and reviewing non-fiction books, often on politics (you can find reviews of ‘Unspeakable Things’, ‘The Establishment’, ‘Captive State’ and ‘Rise of the Political Class’ elsewhere on this blog) and continuing in that vein, this week I am reviewing ‘The Blunders of our Government’ by Anthony King and Ivor Crewe. This book is a quite astonishing roundup and exploration of the biggest mistakes that British governments of the past few decades have made including fuck-ups under Thatcher’s, Major’s, Blair’s, Brown’s and even during Cameron’s time, though this book would benefit from an updated version and Cameron’s government is given very little space. This book is written from a non-partisan perspective and, while assigning blame to individuals and the system itself, it steers clear (wisely) of blaming more either the left or right and I think this is a very smart move. Onwards to the review!

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The book covers many blunders, too many to talk about here, but it starts with probably the biggest screw-up of any UK government: the Poll tax scandal. Clearly this is the big one, the blunder that ended Thatcher’s time as Prime Minister and turned, not only her party against her, but most of the country. The authors then proceed to talk about mis-sold pensions that cost many of our citizens considerable sums of money, our exit from the ERM in the 90’s and ‘Black Wednesday’, the mess that was the Millennium Dome, the tax credit debacle that was instigated by Brown and still continues to this day, the billions spent on non-functional IT systems for the NHS, and many, many more, the combined cost of which is too much to even contemplate. Actually, there are a stunning number of other such mistakes including the London Underground Private-Public Partnership blunder that really should be better understood by the general public yet somehow seem to have remained poorly understood by the public-at-large.

In each and every case, the architects of the mistakes are identified and the blunder discussed at length and it is fascinating to read of the germination and eventual implementation of things that quite clearly were not going to succeed. One of the really interesting aspects of this book is how it explains that our system of government seems to encourage, or at least not discourage, blunders by not having enough checks and balances that would put across an opposing viewpoint. Or would, at the very least, challenge policies that are so clearly set up to fail. The Poll tax works as an example of this, with few Ministers willing to argue against something that so clearly not going to work. Yet none of the parties seem keen to change the system and avoid these catastrophic mistakes. Yet again, short-term self-interest maintains the ridiculously expensive status-quo! And every incredibly expensive mistake, and there are a great many of them, falls to the people to pay for.

One of the truly staggering aspects of all of these blunders, is the size and scale of the screw-ups and the astonishing amount of money that was lost in each and every case. The combined total of only the mistakes listed is an incredible amount of money and there’s little doubt that further blunders, like Osborne’s austerity agenda and Iain Duncan Smith’s failed Universal Credit scheme, will have added to this amount. I don’t even want to contemplate the grand total as to do so would be truly depressing!

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It’s entertaining, while also being informative and shocking and it clearly points to changes that could be made to improve the UK system of government. But I don’t expect anything that to happen, and neither, I think, do the authors of this work. Almost everyone responsible for these mistakes was not punished in any meaningful way. Of course Thatcher took the fall for the Poll tax, but most of the architects of these screw-ups departed before their policies were implemented and many were even promoted! How bloody ridiculous yet until this changes, expect more blunders and more money to be wasted.

If you like non-fiction books and you have any interest in politics (and don’t mind a depressing read!), I would say it is worth your time to hunt out this tome and read it. Add it to the list of excellent non-fiction, politics books that I’ve recently read and reviewed and enjoyed. Cheers!

 

My debut novel, ‘Only an atheist can help Godsave the world’, is available now from all electronic retailers. Also check out my other “Rambling” blogs posts for articles on being an indie author, comics, politics, and reviews of books and movies! Also follow me on Twitter @onlyanatheist1. Cheers!

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My ‘rambling’ review of Owen Jones’ ‘The Establishment: And how they get away with it’…

In the past few years I am finding myself reading more and more non-fiction books. This likely ties in with my increasing interest in politics and also coincided with my move back to the UK not that long before the last general election. It also helps that I have access to a library with many new non-fiction books. Funnily enough I can’t even remember which was thelast  fiction book I read, though I am currently enjoying Neil Gaiman’s ‘Trigger Warning’, and I find it strange that it has been so long. I am, of course, concurrently reading comics and graphic novels, but it’s still a little odd. Christopher Brookmyre’s ‘Black Widow’ is next on my list, once I can get my hands on a copy from the library, and we shall just have to see when that is. Anyway, onwards…

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This week I’m reviewing Owen Jones ‘The Establishment: And how they get away with it’. I’ve been a fan of Mr. Jones writings since he first joined the Independent newspaper some years ago. I’ve read his columns since then and followed him after he moved to the Guardian. Actually he’s part of the reason that I switched to that paper the other being that, in my opinion, the Indy significantly declined in quality. I bought and enjoyed Jones’ last book, ‘Chavs: the demonization of the working Class’, and the lovely hardcover version of his new book has been sitting on my shelf since it was published in 2014. I just needed to find the time to read it and I’m glad that I did for it is very enjoyable indeed!

Now, having recently read the excellent ‘The Triumph of the Political Class’, I was familiar with some of the themes of this work such as the role the media plays in helping politicians, who should be evicted, in power and the isolation of large swathes of the electorate from any interest in politics. Still, there was plenty in the book that was new to me such as the role that the Outriders (Think Tanks and the like) played in making Neo-Liberalism the current consensus in mainstream economic thinking. This was something that I was unfamiliar with and was explained with Jones’ typical eloquence. I was also unaware of how the police have been co-opted into The Establishment in a highly alarming way. The section on Corporations and how they scrounge off the state was also throughly enjoyable (and enraging!). Overall, I took much away from this work, as I did when I read ‘Chavs’, and I am glad that I read it.

But one section of the book that really disturbed me was hearing how much control the US has over British affairs including demanding extradition of British citizens to that country. I had heard similar stories in an excellent documentary, the name of which I currently forget, where President Obama pressured the Yemeni government to imprison one of their journalists who was asking uncomfortable questions about drone strikes in that country. And, shockingly the Yemeni government did as it was asked and imprisoned this journalist without charge or trial for simply doing his job. But learning that the UK government also acceded to the demands of the US was equally appalling. Especially as this British citizen had done nothing wrong, at least nothing that would have been prosecuted under UK law. That we would treat our own citizens in such a manner is truly terrifying.

Jones’ book also details how things can be swung back the other way, how the left can begin to reclaim the ground lost using similar tactics as the Outriders did. There is much to be learnt from a victory this decisive and though the battle ahead looks hopeless, the role that these Think Tanks played in changing the terms of the discussion can teach the left a lot. And we desperately need the conversation to be turned back towards the politics of hope. We also need to swing our society back towards collectivism rather than the individualism that has taken hold and we need a coherent strategy to do this. The strategies of the Outriders can be useful in this pursuit.

If you are either a fan of Owen Jones from his work at the Indy and the Guardian, or you have an interest in how our politics got to the current state that it is in, then I recommend that you read The Establishment. If, like me, you would like to know who was responsible for the sea-change away from the democratic socialism that we used to have and towards the rampant capitalism that is the current way of thinking,  and how they did it, then this book helpfully paints a picture. I for one will be looking forward to Jones’ next work and continuing to enjoy his columns in the Guardian. Cheers!

 

My debut novel, ‘Only an atheist can help Godsave the world’, is available now from all electronic retailers. Also check out my other “Rambling” blogs posts for articles on being an indie author, comics, politics, and reviews of books and movies! Also follow me on Twitter @onlyanatheist1. Cheers!

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